Answers — of a sort

So I went to my doctor’s a couple of days ago to see why I’m so freaking fatigued these days. And it appears that my thyroid is acting up again (as I suspected). My TSH levels are… low… very low. Like the low scale would be .4 something and I’m at .13 something. Which is weird. Low levels are generally associated with hyperthyroidism not hypothyroidism, which is what I have. My free T4 levels are low too, but not as low as my TSH level. My free T4 levels are just below the normal range, but still low.

Anyway, what this all means is that kind of explains why I’ve been falling asleep fatigued lately. My thyroid is acting up again. The main problem is that this is probably a direct reaction to upping my meds a few months ago, but we upped my meds because (if I remember correctly) I went to the doctor’s because I was feeling tired and my nails were getting brittle, and blah blah blah — same reason why I went to the doctor’s this time. So I don’t even know if going back on my old dose will be helpful. But here’s to hoping. And here’s to hoping that there isn’t something worse underneath all of these numbers (adrenal or pituitary problems).

Image result for thyroid fatigue

Anyway, that kind of explains my lack of posts these past few months. My thyroid is misbehaving, and it’s playing merry hell with my energy levels. It’s not an excuse for ignoring y’all, but it’s definitely a reason.

17 thoughts on “Answers — of a sort

  1. purpleslob

    Oh no, Willow! I sure understand about the TSH levels flucuating! I’ve been on the same dose for 9 months- longest stretch ever in the last 30 yrs!
    Glad u caught it now tho, and your energy goes back up to, or higher than your “normal”.
    Whenever will all these doctors realize that our bodies are not the “Ranges” on their calculators??? Those ranges are there because they are averages!! People can be higher or lower! Anyway, don’t let me get wound up!

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    1. Willow Post author

      The doctor I saw was really nice about it. She listened, took the blood test, and sent in a new prescription right away. She wants me to come back in four weeks to check my levels again, so we’ll see. I’m also going to try a new “diet” — not for weight loss, but one that’s supposed to help with thyroid issues. Maybe. I haven’t read the book yet, it’s on the way.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Willow Post author

          Eh, I prefer not to say until I know if it’s all woo or not. Since I haven’t read it yet, I don’t know. Could be a cartload of BS wrapped behind some person’s degree.

          Do you know what they call someone who passed medical school with a 2.0 grade average (that would be a D)? They call that person “Doctor”. Same with anyone who cheated their way through medical school. Also, anyone with a PhD is called “Doctor” but they’re not necessarily medical doctors. The college I went to was an engineering college, and I knew more people called “Doctor” than I could shake a stick at, but not one of them was a doctor of medicine. Just because someone has a degree, it does not mean they know what they’re talking about.

          Anyway, I haven’t read the book yet. So I’m not gonna say if it’s a good book or one I would recommend. If it is, I’ll totally give you the name, because information should be shared freely. ^_^

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Willow Post author

          Don’t even waste a second thought on it. It was all “Throw away your meds from big Pharma and buy OUR stuff instead.” I tore the book apart and threw it away.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Marilyn Armstrong

    I’ve got low blood sugar. But, it turns out, low blood sugar can flip around and easily become high blood sugar (diabetes). Essentially, what I’ve been told is that when you are “out of whack,” up or down, what exactly happens is not entirely predictable. I went from having very low blood pressure to high blood pressure almost overnight and that has happened to other people, too.

    Also, when we take a lot of medications, I think we need a medication doctor who really understands all the interactions. I often suspect that doctors only “get” the drugs THEY use and don’t know much about any others.

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    1. Willow Post author

      I only take meds for my thyroid and bipolar, and I make sure every doctor knows what meds I’m on and that I’m concerned about interactions. Especially the bipolar meds, because I don’t want anything interfering with those.

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  3. Sadje

    I have had thyroid disease nearly all my adult life. Cycling from hypo to hyper thyroidism . Now for last 19 years or so my thyroid just gave up and is presumed dead! I am on thyroxine but have to have tests every 3 months or so to check the TSH levels. I tend to go towards hyperthyroidism very frequently meaning a rapid heart rate, very light sleep and tiredness. One good thing is that I can lose weight quickly.

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      1. Sadje

        I don’t get weight loss but I find it easier to lose weight. I just had weight loss once in my life when I first started on thyroxine. I lost 35 pounds and was extremely happy.

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  4. Melanie B Cee

    You’ve reminded me to get my overly tired fanny into my doctor and see if that’s what’s going on with me. They (so far and knock wood) have never found any issues with my thyroid (except for a few very small nodules that never change) or the levels. It could be anemia too, because that is an issue for me. I’m glad you found the explanation and you were savvy enough to follow up on what you know. It always amuses me, in a bitter kind of way, how the doctors tend to poo-poo our self diagnoses, yet we’re the ones living in the wonky body. We OUGHT to know best. And I’m not talking about those people who make it hard for the rest of us by being overly hypochondria conditioned…

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    1. Willow Post author

      I’m lucky that I’ve found doctors who will listen this time. Hopefully the med change will help. I’d give you a longer answer, but… I’m tired. ^_^

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